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2.1      Fatal Accident – A case summary

This is what can go wrong when vehicles and pedestrians are not segregated.

On a Saturday morning a foreman and quarry operative were processing materials in a small quarry. Following a midmorning tea break together in the canteen near the quarry entrance, they both set off to return to the working quarry. The quarry operative drove his front end loader and the foreman walked along the haul road to his 360 tracked excavator. This was something they had done several times a day for over six years. It was a bright sunny winter day with the sun very low in the sky. As the quarry operative drove the front end loader forwards along the quarry floor to the processing area, towards the low sun, he did not see the foreman and ran over him. The foreman never recovered consciousness and later died of his injuries. 

This incident highlights the importance of segregating pedestrians from quarry traffic and why you should tackle it now!

It is vital for each quarry to establish safe pedestrian access routes and ensure that plans and rules are communicated to both drivers and pedestrians and that they are monitored, enforced and regularly reviewed.

2.2      Illustrated Examples of Improvements to Pedestrian Safety Controls on site

There will be a link to case studies here in due course

2.3      Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Pedestrians

Site Rules normally require pedestrians to wear Safety Helmet, Safety Boots and Hi-Vis clothing as a minimum. There are often areas within the quarry requiring additional ppe such as Safety Glasses, Hearing Protection and suitable gloves. It is good practice to have all these items on your person so you are equipped to enter areas of the site that require these additional items.

It is important to note that High Visibility clothing is the last line of defence in preventing incidents between vehicles and pedestrians. In a collision it will not protect against injury, and should not be relied upon to always make you visible to vehicle operators. They may not see you for all sorts of reasons, such as being distracted, or having vision temporarily impaired by, for example, bright sunshine, reflections from surface water, or you not being in their direct line of site.

However,

Hi-Vis clothing of the appropriate standard is the front-line of pedestrian visibility PPE on site and must always be worn according to site rules and where persons would be at risk when not clearly seen by others such as vehicle drivers, fixed-plant operators, fitters, supervisors, colleagues etc.

It must be maintained and kept in good order and replaced when appropriate.

It should never be considered acceptable to wear poorly maintained high visibility clothing in designated areas. We should not accept that grubby & poorly maintained high visibility clothing is ever a “Badge of Honour”.

Fitters for example, due to the nature of their work, may well need to change outer workwear more often in order to maintain the effectiveness of hi-visibility clothing. It is important that this type of activity is assessed against the clothing provided. More frequent laundering, additional spare sets over and above that issued to other trades on site should be considered. It is also most important to consider the contrast in colour between hi-vis PPE and a given back-ground. DO NOT ASSUME that a bright yellow or orange will ALWAYS stand out against any background. Each site will have its unique shades of whatever minerals are being processed there, so consider the contrast.

The same goes for faded PPE, in that it may have started as a stark contrast to its background but when dulled over time, will often blend dangerously with its background.

In addition, note that particular weather conditions can also alter a back-drop such as low, bright sunshine or glare off a water or icy surface

  • NEVER ASSUME YOU WILL AUTOMATICALLY BE SEEN BY OTHERS
  • JUST BECAUSE YOU CAN SEE THEM – IT DOES NOT NECESSARILY MEAN THEY CAN SEE YOU
  • WHEN APPROACHING VEHICLES ON FOOT ENSURE YOU FOLLOW THE SITE VEHICLE APPROACH PROCEDURES AND GET VISUAL CONTACT AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF YOUR PRESENCE BEFORE PROCEEDING.

2.4 : Pedestrian Safety Poster : “Let’s Pretend

Let’s Pretend ...

Let’s pretend you’re my Dad today,

Let’s pretend I’m at work with you & let’s pretend I’m by your side everywhere you go,

  • To & from your machine
  • To & from your control cabin
  • To & from the weighbridge
  • To & from the canteen
  • To & from the workshops
  • To & from that job on the plant
  • To & from the Site Office

NOW YOU’VE GOT ME TO THINK ABOUT, WILL YOU STILL

  • Short-cut across the yard?
  • Wander down the haul road?
  • Stray across the workshop apron?
  • Stop , chat or phone where plant is operating?

OR WILL YOU

  • Stay alert?
  • Think about the dangers around you?
  • Make sure you keep us both out of harm’s way?